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Founded in 1994, Galeria Aniela won the trust of most important Australian artists from the post WWII until today. Selling world-class ART of impeccable provenance, shipping worldwide, we built the reputation in Australia and all over the World. When you buy a work of art from Galeria Aniela, we immediately pay the artist, helping artists make living with their creations including Jamie Boyd, Lenore Boyd, John Olsen, Arthur Boyd, John Perceval, Stephen Glassborow, Charles Blackman, Guy Boyd, Ningura Napurrula and many more.

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Wentja Morgan Napaltjarri B.1945

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Biography

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Wentja Morgan Napaltjarri is a great artist of integrity and brilliant talent. The genius of Wentja Morgan Napaltjarri is encapsulated in her conveying of an authentic sacred narrative within a fully realized art object of considerable hypnotic power. Wentja's work has been exhibited in leading Australian and international exhibitions, including 2003 Masterpieces show in London.

She transmitter of her cultural heritage into contemporary inspiring paintings with accuracy of intricate details and multi-dimensional appearance. Wentja paintings have the sheer physical presence of the much contemporary work of art highly sought after by major collections such as the Kerry Stokes, Thomas Vroom, National Aboriginal Art and Culture Institute in Adelaide, Artbank, Homes a Court, Art Gallery of South Australia, Art Gallery of Western Australia, Queensland Art Gallery, Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory etc.

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Artist: Wentja Napaltjarri
Title: Sand-hills
Waterhole ENLARGE
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen
Size: 160 cm x
98 cm

Price: AU $9,900 Enquire

Click to Enlarge:  Wentja 2 Napaltjarri, Sand hills and Yam FlowersCat. no. 10-177-1711, Synthetic polymer on Belgian linen, 158 by 96 cm
Artist: Wentja 2 Napaltjarri
Title: Sand-hills Desert-flowers
ENLARGE
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen

Size: 160 cm x 98 cm

Price: AU $9,900 Enquire

Wentja 2 Napaltjarri, Oaks Ochre 77-0991, Acrylic on Belgian linen, 156 x 62 cm - Price: SOLD
Artist: Wentja 2 Napaltjarri
Title: Sand hills, Waterholes

Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen

Size: 180 cm x 60 cm

Price: SOLD

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Wentja 2 Napaltjarri Biography: (page 221) Encyclopedia of Aboriginal Artists Dictionary of Biographies.

Wentja Morgan is an artist and a custodian of law. Wentja paintings key motif is the Rockhole which represent mesmerising connecting circles in the Desert. She paints with emotional dynamism the place where her family sang and camped. Wentja songs and music are fused into her paintings. Her paintings

Wentja work has been exhibited in leading Australian and international exhibitions, including the 2003 exhibition Masterpieces from the Western Desert, held in London. Her works are included in major collections, such as the Kerry Stokes and Thomas Vroom Collections and the National Aboriginal Art and Culture Institute in Adelaide.

Apart from the place of birth, the other crucial factor in Wentja Morgan Napaltjarri formation as an artist was her parentage. Wentja Morgan Napaltjarri father was Shorty Lungkata Tjungurrayi (1920-1987), a Pintupi man who was one of the outstanding founding figures in the Papunya painting movement, while her mother was Napulu Nangala. Wentyja father  Shorty Lungkata Tjungurrayi was one of the original founders of the Western Desert art movement.

Wentja Morgan Napaltjarri was born in 1945 in Pintupi country North-West of Walungurru, she came first to Haasts Bluff then moved to Papunya.

Wentja met her husband, Ginger Tjakamarra (1940-2008) at Haasts Bluff and the couple eventually moved to Papunya, where Wentja started painting as Shorty Lungkata Tjungurrayi apprentice (her father).

 Wentja Morgan Napaltjarri (with her sister, Tjunkiya Napaltjarri) took part in the Minyma Tjukurrpa Project (Women’s Dreaming Project) from the Ikuntji (Haasts Bluff) and Walungurru (Kintore) Art Centres. Wentja work was included in the first exhibition of paintings produced at that time.

Wentja Napaltjarri has now been painting all of her life. Her first works were collaborative, helping out the men in the family with their work. While they painted the stories, Wentja did the dotting in-fill, characteristic of the Papunya Tula artists to whom her father belonged. Wentja lives at Mt Liebig and continues her career painting for Watiyawanu Artists.

Wentja mostly paints Blue Tongue Lizard and Water Dreaming stories, the iconography for which has been handed down to her by her father. She also paints Sandhills, Rockholes, and other landmarks associated with Water and Desert Oaks.

In contrast to her father's work, Wentja's paintings are less geometric with a softening of iconography through interlacing with intricate finely dotted patterning. This soft dotting technique is characteristic of many of the Mount Liebig women artists with whom she paints.

Aboriginal Artists Dictionary of Biographies is meticulously researched biographical dictionary 446 pages hardcover  book, containing more than 1000 entries and (colour illustrations). The book includes a brief biography and relevant exhibition entries for artists who painted from the beginning of the 1970’s to the first decade of the 21st century. The definitive work on the subject of desert artists.

Wentja Morgan Napaltjarri distinctive style paintings are highly sought by the Australian and international art collectors. Wentja 2 creates top-quality modern paintings and some have powerful multi-dimensional nature and the sheer physical presence of much contemporary work of art that neither can be replicated by digital image as the intricate details and subtle shades of colour wash are lost in the process of internet transfer.

Wentja's early system of connecting concentric circles and dotted bands has been replaced by mesmerising fields of tonal colours. Her paintings display a key motif, in most cases a large roundel, which represents an important rockhole where her family regularly camped. Surrounding the rockhole is a charged energy field of intricate dots. While she works, Wentja sings about the rockhole, and the songs and music are incorporated into her paintings.

AWARDS

2007 25th Telstra NATSIAA Australian National Art Award

2006 Alice Springs Art Prize

2005 23rd Telstra NATSIAA Australian National Art Award - Museum Art Gallery Northern Territory

2002 20th Telstra NATSIAA Australian National Art Award- Museum Art Gallery Northern Territory

COLLECTIONS

Art Bank, Sydney

Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide

Homes a Court Collection, Perth

Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth

Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane

Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin

The Kerry Stokes Collection, Australia

National Aboriginal Art and Cultural Institute Tandanya

Flinders University Museum

Thomas Vroom Collection

Tandanya National Aboriginal Art & Cultural Institute

also private and corporate collections in Denmark, Poland, England and Germany

Exhibitions

Wentja work has been exhibited in leading Australian and international exhibitions, including the 2003 exhibition Masterpieces from the Western Desert, held in London. Her works are included in major collections, such as the Kerry Stokes and Thomas Vroom Collections and the National Aboriginal Art and Culture Institute in Adelaide.

2000-2003 Chapel on Chapel, Melbourne

2004 Selected in the Alice Prize

2004 Cooee Gallery, Sydney

2005 Cooee gallery, Sydney

2005 Divas of the Desert, Gallery Gondwana

2006 NATSIAA Telstra Awards, Darwin

2005 Watiyawanu Artists, Japingka Gallery,  Fremantle WA

2006 Bond Aboriginal Art, Adelaide SA

2006 Knud Grothe Gallery, Denmark Copenhagen

2006 Towards Black and White, Japingka Gallery, Fremantle WA

2006 Australian Aboriginal Art 2006/2007, John  Gordon Gallery, NSW

2006  This is our Story – 8 selected works, Colliding Worlds Exhibition, Tandanya

2006  Luminaries of the Desert, Japingka Gallery, Fremantle WA

2007  Watiyawanu Artists of Amunturrngu, Japingka Gallery, Fremantle WA

2008  Watiyawanu Artists, Japingka Gallery, Fremantle WA

2014  Dot Code: Desert Artists, Japingka Gallery, Fremantle WA

In 2002 Wentja was a finalist in the Telstra National Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander Art Award. Wentja has participated in exhibitions in Melbourne, Sydney and Adelaide with other Watiyawanu artists and her work has been exhibited widely across Australia.

Wentja's sand hills, rock halls paintings, are landmarks associated with water, desert oaks, 'Blue Tongue Lizard and Water Dreaming' stories which has been hand down to her by her father. Unlike her father geometric work, Wentja 2 work has soft female iconography influence. She has a very strong connection with her culture and a distinctive style, she sings when painting and include songs in her painting which gives a powerful cultural experience and people say that they feel the vibration of her songs and music in her work. She creates softer iconography image in her paintings with interlacing with intricate finely doted patterning. In her paintings, Wentja 2 depicts the colour of the Australian Central Desert country. She is a highly talented and accomplished  artist with a very individual creative flair and a real consistency in her work, and style.

Article Wentja Morgan Napaltjarri: The artist of the great heritage by Professor Sasha Grishin

Wentja Morgan Napaltjarri is the artist of the great heritage!

Wentja Morgan Napaltjarri is an artist of enormous integrity and talent, a gifted translator and transmitter of her symbolic and cultural heritage.

Wentja Morgan Napaltjarri was born at Malparinga in 1945, a rockhole site close to the south-west tip of Wilkinkarra (Lake Mackay), in Western Australia. This site was to become one of the main Tjukurrpa (Dreaming subjects) for the artist. It is associated with the Lungkata, the Blue-tongue Lizard Man, and it is on the route travelled by the ancestral women of the Kungka Tjukurrpa, related to the vast and sacred Tingarri cycle of the Pintupi people that in this instance is also connected with young men’s initiation and learning.

The Tingarri women’s journey began west of Jupiter Well and eventually ran due east, concluding south-east of Wilkinkarra. The ancestral elders performed rituals and opened up the country as they journeyed and camped at many rockholes along the way, including Malparinga.

Apart from the place of birth, the other crucial factor in her formation as an artist was her parentage. Her father was Shorty Lungkata Tjungurrayi, a Pintupi man who was one of the outstanding founding figures in the Papunya painting movement, while her mother was Napulu Nangala. Shorty Lungkata Tjungurrayi was born in about 1920 at Walukuritji, south of Kaakurutintjinya (Lake Macdonald), which was also the place where his father died.

After he married Napulu Nangala, he and his family walked to Ikuntji (Haasts Bluff) in about 1948, which was a Lutheran mission established two years earlier as a home to Western Arrernte, Pintupi and Pitjantjatjara people. It was a source of permanent water and of provisions, but it also served as a way of controlling the local nomadic peoples to prevent them from interfering with the spreading cattle industry that was destroying the fragile and ancient environment.

By the time the family moved to Ikuntji, Wentja Morgan Napaltjarri was about three years old and this was her first contact with white people. She had been raised in a traditional manner learning how to gather bush tucker, hunting for small game by following tracks in the bush, and she was exposed to the ritual knowledge of her people.

The family stayed in Ikuntji for about a decade before moving to the newly established settlement at Papunya, roughly 240 km northwest of Alice Springs. This settlement consisted primarily of Pintupi, Luritja, Warlpiri, Arrernte and Anmatyerre peoples. At Papunya, Shorty Lungkata Tjungurrayi was recognised, within the Pintupi community, as one of the leading senior men, a ngangkari (traditional healer), famous for his hunting, singing and dancing skills, and as a man widely known as an authority on ritual matters.

In 1971 Geoffrey Bardon, who trained in art education at the National Art School in Sydney, took up a posting at the Papunya primary school. Here he facilitated the painting of the Honey Ant Dreaming mural on a school wall as well as the painting of the early painted boards. The former was destroyed, while the latter, of which about a thousand were painted before the introduction of canvases in 1973, became highly prized artworks.

These were amongst the earliest acrylic paintings from the central deserts to be made for ‘permanent’ public viewing, rather than as designs conceived as ephemeral sand paintings or body decorations. The result of considerable negotiations amongst the traditional custodians of the stories (the Tjukurrpa) involved, these paintings may have been the first occasion when much of this imagery—by being shown in public—was revealed to the uninitiated.

This caused considerable excitement in the Aboriginal community and Bardon observed that the mural had a far-reaching impact, for people who believed “in a Dreaming ‘eternity’ caused the artistic ideas developed at Papunya to spread to other Aboriginal communities throughout the Western Desert and Central Desert”. Inexplicably the cultural worth of the mural was not recognised and shortly after Bardon left Papunya the mural was treated as unauthorized graffiti and was destroyed when the school walls were repainted in 1974.

However, during Bardon’s stay in Papunya—between January 1971 and December 1972 - an enthusiasm developed amongst many of the mainly Pintupi and Anmatyerre–Arrernte men for painting their designs on panels with acrylic paint. Shorty Lungkata Tjungurrayi was one of the last artists to join Bardon’s foundation Papunya painting group.

In November 1972 Papunya Tula Artists Pty Ltd was incorporated (the word tula may refer to a small hill near Papunya, a Honey Ant Dreaming site) and subsequently it became an important player, firstly in the Australian and then on the international art market. By the late 1970s and the early 1980s, after the establishment of the Aboriginal Land Rights Act, late in 1976, many of the people left Papunya for their traditional lands—for example, Pintupi communities were established at Kintore and at Kiwirrkura, where artists continued to live and work. However, the Papunya Tula cooperative thrived, despite many of the contributing artists no longer living there.

The Papunya group achieved a remarkable synthesis of ceremony and topography, realised in a meticulous dot-painting technique and frequently restricted to an earthy palette rich in ochres, reds, black and white. Some of the paintings could be interpreted as involving a reenactment of elaborate ground paintings, using a limited number of symbols or motifs, such as the U-shape, concentric circles, semicircles, lines and dashes, human, animal and bird tracks and journey lines, a symbolic morphology also encountered in body designs, all employed to convey a wide range of meanings.

A concentric circle may stand for a waterhole in one context, while, in another, it can signify a campsite. Elsewhere it may represent part of a plant, a body part, a hill or a nest.

Much depended on the context of the specific narrative. As in Christian iconography, where a particular motif may be read simultaneously on a number of different levels depending on the spiritual enlightenment of the beholder and the liturgical context, similarly in Central and Western Desert painting the same symbol may have different levels of meaning depending on the viewer’s level of initiation.

A U-shape may be read as a topographical form or as a sacred camping site of an ancestral being or as a secret part of a ceremony known only to a fully initiated person. The paintings can be visual parables, of graded decipherability. It is not that sacred imagery is not sometimes depicted in a composition; rather, disclosure is dependent on the initiatory status of the viewer. Then, at a further level of complexity, the shimmering white dots become a symbolic as well as an effective visual device, veiling the levels of meaning.

Wentja Morgan Napaltjarri began painting for Papunya Tula in 1996. Earlier, apprenticed to her father, she was entrusted with many of her father’s Tjukurrpa and the animals that appear within them, including bandicoots, echidnas and goannas.

In many of her paintings Wentja Morgan Napaltjarri employs the roundel or oval shape—also encountered in the work of her father—to depict the rockhole. Frequently, a series of roundels represents several rockholes, and the mandala-like shapes so formed function as a powerful meditative locus. The genius of Wentja Morgan Napaltjarri thus is encapsulated in her conveying of an authentic sacred narrative within a fully realised art object of considerable hypnotic power.

written by: Professor Sasha Grishin, AM, FAHA

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10-1058268

Artist: Wentja Morgan Napaltjarri

In the World of contemporary art, Wentja Morgan Napaltjarri is recognised as an innovative modern abstract artist.

Title:  Sand-Hills Rock Hole cat. no. 10-1058268
“Sand-Hills Rock Hole” is Wentja’s museum-quality masterwork of impeccable provenance. The painting is beautiful and hypnotic images seem to move with the viewer’s eyes giving illusion of multi-dimensional space and depth. This museum-quality painting has the shear physical presence of the much contemporary work of art. It depicts soft Sand  iconography interlacing with finely doted patterning of the muted tones building up the mysterious topography.

Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen (stretched in quality timber)

Size: 160 cm x 98 cm

Provenance: Watiyawanu Artists of Amunturrngu Community

Price: AU $9,900  Enquire  - shipping worldwide  - price may change without prior notice

Galeria Aniela recognizes the importance of the buyer's confidence in purchasing an original, authentic, ethically sourced work of art of impeccable provenance.

AWARDS

2007 25th Telstra NATSIAA Australian National Art Award the Museum of the Northern Territory

2006 Alice Springs Prize

2005 23rd Telstra NATSIAA Australian National Art Award the Museum Art Gallery Northern Territory

2002 20th Telstra NATSIAA Australian National Art Award the Museum Art Gallery Northern Territory

COLLECTIONS

Art Bank, Sydney

Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide

Homes a Court Collection, Perth

Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth

Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane

Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin

The Kerry Stokes Collection Australia, National Aboriginal Art and Cultural Institute Tandanya, Flinders University Museum, Thomas Vroom Collection

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Yam Flowers 77-1711

Artist: Wentja Morgan Napaltjarri

Title: Sand Hills Flowers cat. No. 77-1711

A museum-quality painting that has the shear physical presence of the much contemporary work of art. It depicts yam flowers and soft Sand iconography interlacing with finely doted patterning of the muted tones building up a mysterious, topography the Central Desert. Wentja Morgan paintings are the landmarks associated with water and desert of her 'Water Dreaming' stories.

Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen (stretched in quality timber)

Size: 160 cm x 98 cm

Provenance: Watiyawanu Artists of Amunturrngu Community

Price: AU $9,900  Enquire  - shipping worldwide  - price may change without prior notice

Galeria Aniela recognizes the importance of the buyer's confidence in purchasing an original, authentic, ethically sourced work of art of impeccable provenance.

AWARDS

2007 25th Telstra NATSIAA Australian National Art Award the Museum of the Northern Territory

2006 Alice Springs Prize

2005 23rd Telstra NATSIAA Australian National Art Award selected Museum Art Gallery Northern Territory

2002 20th Telstra NATSIAA Australian National Art Award finalist Museum Art Gallery Northern Territory

COLLECTIONS

Art Bank Sydney

Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide

Homes a Court Collection, Perth

Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth

Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane

Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin

The Kerry Stokes Collection, Australia, National Aboriginal Art and Cultural Institute Tandanya, Flinders University Museum, Thomas Vroom Collection

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