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Welcome! Established in 1994, Galeria Aniela won the trust of some of the most important Australian artists. We recognize the importance of the buyer confidence in purchasing ethically sourced authentic works of art. Galeria Aniela specializes in museum-quality, modern Australian paintings and sculptures of impeccable provenance. We combine the knowledge of fine art and financial expertise, shipping to a worldwide buyer base, or Pick Up from Galeria Aniela. With a wide network of resources, provide advice for the collector and the investor, able to assist in forming collections and can also source artworks by specific artists. Our people focused approach ensures enjoyable and rewarding experience. Works of art live for generation, bringing new dreams and new ways of seeing our world, be part of this magic world of the finest of art that please your heart, mind and soul.

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Arthur Boyd (1920-1999)    

Arthur Boyd, wife Yvonne and Aniela, the Best of Boyd Exhibition in Galeria Aniela, May 1997Arthur Merric Bloomfield Boyd (24 July 1920 – 24 April 1999) was one of the leading Australian painters of the late 20th century. In 2012 Arthur Boyd ‘Bride Running Away’ sold for $1.68 million.

The Boyd family artistic dynasty includes painters, sculptors, architects and other arts professionals, commencing in 1860 with Boyd's grandfather Arthur Merric Boyd, Boyd's father Merric and mother Doris, uncles Penleigh Boyd and Martin Boyd, and brothers Guy Boyd and David Boyd. Mary Boyd, his sister and also a painter, married first John Perceval, and then later ney Nolan, both artists. Boyd's wife, Yvonne Boyd (née Lennie) was also a painter as are their children Jamie Boyd, Polly and Lucy.

Galeria Aniela and the distinguished Boyd family have a long and very successful partnership and we look forward to working together for many years to come. We are excited that we can bring the best quality works of art of impeccable provenance the World Art Market has to offer to many International and Australians art lovers at competitive prices.

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Auction resultsBiographyLimited edition printsVideos

Click to Enlarge: Arthur Boyd (1920-1999), Shoalhaven River with Clouds, Oil on Board, 31 cm x 21 cm
Arthur Boyd
Shoalhaven with Clouds
1980
Oil on Board
Image: 31 x 21 cm
Price & more details
Click to Enlarge: Arthur-Boyd (1920-1999)  'Nebuchadnezzar by A Windmil'l, Oil on Composition Board, 21 cm x 25 cm
Arthur Boyd
Nebuchadnezzar Windmill
1968
Oil on Board
21.5 x 25.5 cm
Price & more details
Click to Enlarge: Arthur Boyd (1920-1999), Shoalhaven River Escarpment c.1970-75, Oil on Board, 36 cm x 30 cm
Arthur Boyd
Shoalhaven Escarpment 1975-7
8
Oil on Board
Size: 36 x 30 cm
Price & more details

VIDEO: the ABC TV |Sunday Afternoon Boyd Exhibition in Galeria Aniela fine art gallery NSW Australia

Click to Enlarge: Arthur Boyd (1920-1999), Shoalhaven River with Three White Cockatoos, Oil on Board, 38 cm x 31 cm
Arthur Boyd
S
hoalhaven River with Three White Cockatoos
Oil on Board
Image Size: 38 cm x 30 cm
Price & more details
Click to Enlarge: Arthur Boyd (1920-1999), Shoalhaven Rive with Black Swan and Two White Cockatoos, Oil on board, 38 cm x 31 cm
Arthur Boyd
Shoalhaven River, 2 Cockatoos & Black Swan
Oil on Board
Image Size: 38 cm x 30 cm
Price & more details
Click to Enlarge: Arthur Boyd (1920-1999), Bride with Necklace Drinking from the Shoalhaven River c.1970-75, Oil on Board, 30 cm x 20 cm
Arthur Boyd
B
ride with Necklace Drinking, Shoalhaven River
Oil on Board
Image Size: 30 cm x 20 cm
Price & more details

VIDEO: the ABC TV| Australian National News | Boyd Exhibition |Cameron O'Reilly speak, Dep. Chairman National Gallery of Australia

Click to Enlarge: Arthur Boyd (1920-1999), Shoalhaven River with Black Swan and Three White Cockatoos, Oil on board, 38 cm x 31 cm
Arthur Boyd
S
hoalhaven River,  Black Swan
and 3 Cockatoos
Oil on Board
Image Size:
38 cm x 30 cm
Price & more details
Click to Enlarge: Arthur Boyd (1920-1999), Shoalhaven River with Black Swan, Oil on board, 38 cm x 31 cm
Arthur Boyd
Shoalhaven River with Black Swan
Oil on Board
Image Size: 38 cm x 30 cm
Price & more details
Click to Enlarge: Arthur Boyd (1920-1999),  Bride and Serpent, Oil on Canvas, 122 cm x 102 cm
Arthur Boyd
Bride with Serpent (Illustrated)
Oil on Canvas
Image Size:
122 cm x 102 cm
Price & more details
prices may change without prior notice contact us - A Century of Boyd Exhibition
Click to Enlarge: Arthur Boyd, Shoalhaven Riverbank c.1970, Oil on Copper, 62 cm x  45 cm
Arthur Boyd
Shoalhaven Escarpment 1976
Oil on Copper

60.5 cm x 43 cm

Price & more details

Arthur Boyd
Shoalhaven at Sunset
1976-78
Oil on Copper
60.5 x 43 cm
Price & more details
SOLD - Arthur Boyd, Shoalhaven at Sunset II, oil on copper, 30.5 x  22.5 cm
Arthur Boyd
Shoalhaven at Sunset
Oil on Copper
30 x 22 cm
Price: SOLD
Galeria Aniela offers buyers an opportunity to purchase top-quality autentic art of impeccable provenance, visit the gallery or phone +612 4465 1494
Click to Enlarge: Arthur Boyd (1920-1999) 'Nebuchadnezzar on Fire' circa 1968 (illustrated 1st Ed. 5/30 book), Oil on Canvas, Size: 21 cm x 25 cm
Arthur Boyd
Nebuchadnezzar on Fire, Fallen in a Field
Oil on Canvas
21.5 x 25.5 cm
Price: SOLD
SOLD - Arthur Boyd, Shoalhaven Waterfall Bather and The Elder, Oil on canvas
Arthur Boyd
Waterfall Bather and The Elder
Oil on canvas
60 x 45 cm

Price: SOLD
SOLD - Arthur Boyd, Shoalhaven River and White Cockatoos, oil on copper, 38 x 30.5 cm
Arthur Boyd
Shoalhaven & White Cockatoos
Oil on Copper
38 x 30 cm

Price: SOLD
Galeria Aniela offers buyers an opportunity to purchase top-quality autentic art of impeccable provenance, visit the gallery or phone +612 4465 1494
SOLD - Arthur Boyd, Pulpit Rock (Shoalhaven) Oil on canvas, 82 x 82 cm
Arthur Boyd
Pulpit Rock
Oil on canvas
82 x 82 cm

Price:
SOLD
SOLD - Arthur Boyd, Lady and The Green Serpent, Oil on canvas, 122 x 92 cm
Arthur Boyd
Woman with Green Serpent
Oil on canvas
122 x 92 cm

Price: SOLD
SOLD - Arthur Boyd, Shoalhaven River Bundanon, Oil on canvas, 30.5 x 21.5
 
Arthur Boyd
Shoalhaven River Bundanon
Oil on canvas
30.5 x 21.5

Price: SOLD
Boyd major exhibition in LONDON September 2013 '200 years of Australian art' in the London Royal Academy include significant loans from the Australian National Gallery in Canberra collections, arguably Boyd's greatest masterpiece, enormously important Paintings
SOLD: Arthur Boyd, Nude Unveiled, Oil and collage on board paper, 55 x 65 cm
Arthur Boyd
Nude Unveiled
oil and collage
55 x 65 cm
Price:
SOLD
SOLD - Arthur Boyd, RED ROCK 1990 Magic Flute, Oil on canvas, 147 x 154.5 cm
Arthur Boyd
Red Rock - Magic Flute1990

Oil on canvas
147 x 154 cm

Price: SOLD
SOLD - Arthur Boyd,  Allegory and Myth - Magic Flute, Oil on canvas, 180 x 180 cm
Arthur Boyd
Allegory and Myth - Magic Flute
Oil on canvas
180 x 180 cm
Price: SOLD
Galeria Aniela offers buyers an opportunity to purchase top-quality autentic art of impeccable provenance, visit the gallery or phone +612 4465 1494
SOLD - Arthur Boyd, Black Pool and The Queen of the Night - Magic Flute, Oil on canvas, 250 x 200 cm
Arthur Boyd
Black Pool, Queen of the Night Magic Flute
Oil on canvas
250 x 200 cm

Price: SOLD
SOLD -  Arthur Boyd, The Green Queen of the Night - Magic Flute, Oil on canvas, 200 x 250 cm
Arthur Boyd
The Green Queen of the Night Magic Flute
 Oil on canvas
200 x 250 cm

Price: SOLD
SOLD - Arthur Boyd, Three Ladies Magic Flute, Oil on canvas, 200 x 250 cm
Arthur Boyd
Three Ladies Magic Flute,
Oil on canvas
200 x 250 cm
Price: SOLD
Galeria Aniela offers buyers an opportunity to purchase top-quality autentic art of impeccable provenance, visit the gallery or phone +612 4465 1494

Auction Results

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Title

Hammer

Price incl. Premium but exc. GST

Details

Bride Running Away (1957)

AU$1,400,000

A$1,680,000

Oil and tempera on composition board, signed 'Arthur Boyd' lower left, 91.5 x 121.5 cm, Est: $1,400,000-1,600,000, Sotheby's Australia, Important Australian Art, Melbourne, 14/08/2012, Lot No. 19

The Frightened Bridegroom (1958)

AU$1,000,000

A$1,200,000

Oil and tempera on composition board, signed 'Arthur Boyd' lower right, 61.7 x 63.5 cm, Est: $1,000,000-1,200,000, Sotheby's Australia, Important Australian & International Art, Sydney, 23/08/2011, Lot No. 14

Dry Creek Bed, Alice Springs (1953-1954)

AU$1,000,000

A$1,200,000

Oil, tempera and resin on composition board, signed 'Arthur Boyd' lower left, 91.5 x 122 cm, Est: $1,000,000-1,200,000, Sotheby's Australia, Important Australian Art, Sydney, 08/05/2012, Lot No. 20

Bridegroom Waiting for His Bride to Grow Up

AU$900,000

A$1,057,500

Oil on tempera on board, signed 'Arthur Boyd' lower right; titled 'Bridegroom waiting for his Bride to Grow Up' on exhibition label affixed to the reverse, 137.2 x 182.9 cm, Est: $600,000-900,000, Christies, Australian & International Fine Art, Melbourne, 27/11/2001, Lot No. 28

Phantom Bride 1958

AU$900,000

A$1,037,500

Oil and tempera on composition board, signed lower right Arthur Boyd, 162.5 x 139.5 cm, Est: $700,000-900,000, Deutscher~Menzies, Fine Art Auction, Melbourne, 01/05/2002, Lot No. 26

For more information on the auction results it may be worth your while to acquire a membership at http://www.aasd.com.au/

under the freedom of information we compiled relevant facts for you to enjoy. We believe in sharing the knowledge and express deep gratitude to the websites below in particular, and also to all Australian National galleries, Australian and International Press for information they share with us, without them our research would not be available. We hope you will enjoy the free services.

Wikipedia

http://www.aasd.com.au/

http://www.google.com.au/

http://www.artindex.com.au/

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Galeria Aniela offers buyers an opportunity to purchase top-quality autentic art of impeccable provenance, visit the gallery or phone +612 4465 1494

Arthur Boyd Videos  

VIDEO: ABC TV Australian National News Review | Best of Boyd exhibition in Galeria Aniela open by Cameron O'Reilly, Deputy Chairman Australia National Gallery 1997,Arthur Boyd, David Boyd, Jamie Boyd, Lenore Boyd, Guy Boyd and nice Tessa Perceval
 

VIDEO gallery site: ABC TV Australian National News, Review

VIDEO: ABC TV Sunday Afternoon Review Boyd exhibition in Galeria Aniela, Arthur Boyd, David Boyd, Jamie Boyd, Guy Boyd, Lenore Boyd, Tessa Perceval
 

VIDEO gallery site: ABC Sunday Afternoon, Review

Click: Arthur Boyd (1920-1999) 'Bride Running Away' Sotheby's sold for the record price $1.68 million AUVIDEO: Arthur Boyd auction video | Record price for Bride ... media.theage.com.au

VIDEO: Record price for Arthur Boyd painting smh.com.au

VIDEO: Record price for Arthur Boyd painting watoday.com

VIDEO : Arthur Boyd auction video | Record price for Bride ...media.watoday.com.au

VIDEO: Arthur Boyd auction video | Record price for Bride ...media.brisbanetimes.com.au

VIDEO: Arthur Boyd auction video | Record price for Bride ... media.canberratimes.com.au

VIDEO: Arthur Boyd explains why he paints with his hands: Figures in the Landscape - Documentaries

VIDEO: Arthur Boyd - A curator view and opinion of the artist trauma Figure and black rabbit Paintings in the studio

Tate lifts the veil on Boyd Bride |The Australian June 2010

9 News Current Affairs May 2007|  Arthur Boyd painting fetches an impressive $660,000

Tate London acquired Arthur Boyd first Bride at £250,000 June 2010 | London Telegraph

PHOTO: Hon. Bob Hawke (centre), Mrs Blanche D'Alpuget and Aniela

VIDEO: Hon. Bob Hawke AC, The Former Prime Minister of Australia (the longest serving ALP) talks about Australian Aboriginal art and Galeria Aniela

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VIDEO: "Bride and Serpent" oil on canvas, 122.5 x 102.5 cm

   

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Click:  Arthur Boyd authorized Galeria Aniela to sell his original paintings, signed November 1995Click: Front page Sydney Morning Herald 'Best of Boyd Exhibition' in Galeria Aniela, 17 May 1997

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Galeria Aniela offers buyers an opportunity to purchase top-quality autentic art of impeccable provenance, visit the gallery or phone +612 4465 1494

Nebuchadnezzar by A Windmill

Arthur-Boyd (1920-1999), 'Nebuchadnezzar by a Windmill', Oil on Composition Board, 21 cm x 25 cmArthur-Boyd (1920-1999)

Nebuchadnezzar Windmill c. 1968

Oil on Composition Board

Image size: 21 cm x 25 cm
Framed size: 32 cm x 36 cm

EXHIBITED

NOTES: Nebuchadnezzar Windmill reveals the layers of human drama and allegory. Nebuchadnezzar is between the earth and the sky, between man and divinity and in doing so he reminds us of what is glorious and vulnerable.

Price: Enquire

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Nebuchadnezzar Prices

EXHIBITED:

1968 (10-28 March) Arthur Boyd: Bonython Gallery, Adelaide
1968 (8 - 24 April) Arthur Boyd: Nebuchadnezzar, Bonython Gallery, Sydney
1968 (25 June - 5 July) Arthur Boyd: Australian Galleries, Melbourne
1969
(21 Oct- 8 Nov)
Arthur Boyd: Recent Paintings exhibition, Arthur Tooth & Sons Gallery, Haymarket, London
1972 (13 June - 8 July) Arthur Boyd: Arthur Tooth & Sons Gallery, Haymarket, London

Nebuchadnezzar Windmilln was within 34 paintings (include 18 drawings) Exhibition to launch the limited edition book illustrating
Boyd's Nebuchadnezzar series with a text by T.S.R. Boase. However there were
only 30 special limited edition books (all signed, numbered & bound in white leather).
Arthur Tooth & Sons Gallery in Haymarket, London established in 1842 operated until the late 1970’s, was active in the 19th and the 20th century Masters and contemporary art.

Arthur Boyd (the artist) created only 34 small Nebuchadnezzar paintings and now these exquisitely painted little artworks are rare and valuable gems keenly sought after by the World Art Market collectors.

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CONDITION REPORT:

Arthur Boyd's Nebuchadnezzar Windmill (circa 1968) is in pristine condition, no cracking on the surface, no scuffs or scratches to the surface, framed in Gold leaf frame.

Boyd's 'Nebuchadnezzar Windmill' reveals the layers of human drama and allegory. Nebuchadnezzar is between the earth and the sky, between man and divinity and in doing so, he reminds us of what is vulnerable and what is glorious.

The most illuminating condition is love, empathy and passion for the human kind. And also, the awakening of the understanding and compassion for the individual, therefore the work of art which has the most significance is that in which this theme is implicit, the meaning of Arthur Boyd art.

Painted between 1966 and 1968, Nebuchadnezzar series of paintings is considered to be Arthur Boyd's the most powerful and the most sustaining series, conveying a statement of the human conditions, interactions, exchange of ideas and powerful human messages. Technical skills and even beauty, colour and form are subsidiary to the main purpose of painting. That purpose is to reveal and enrich a condition of human nature.

The burning Vietnam was at the front of Arthur Boyd  mind, and it might not be coincidence that here it is the king of our first great civilization who rockets to the ground. Boyd found the allegory from Nebuchadnezzar (c 630-562 BCE) a ruler of Babylon in the Chaldean Dynasty. Nebuchadnezzar traditionally called ‘Nebuchadrezzar the Great’ was famous for his monumental building within his capital of Babylon and construction of the Hanging Gardens of Babylon and known among Christians and Jews for his conquests of Judah and Jerusalem.

Genius is often found in the detail, and the specific brush strokes of the landscape that sit above the skyline, give the painting its perfection. It reminds one of Auden's wry commentary in 'Musée des Beaux Arts' where Icarus plunges into the Mediterranean. They are also very noticeable in the Arthur Boyd's Nebuchadnezzar Windmill painting.

Nebuchadnezzar Collection:

RECENT PRICES (Arthur Boyd's Nebuchadnezzar series)

 fine art is one of the most enjoyable and viable investments

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Shoalhaven River Escarpment

Arthur Boyd (1920-1999), Shoalhaven River Escarpment c.1970-75, Oil on Board, 36 cm x 30 cmArthur Boyd (1920-1999)

Shoalhaven Escarpment circa 1975

 Oil on Board Signed: 'Arthur Boyd' lower right

 Image: 36 cm x  30 cm

During the 1970's Boyd exhibited small oils at Australian Galleries, Melbourne (1976) Fischer Fine Art London (1977). Now these rare 70's paintings are beautiful scarce gems, keenly sought after by the World Art Market and Australian collectors.

Price: Expression of Interest

Arthur Boyd 'Blackbirds Over Shoalhaven' (35 x 28cm) small painting (Joel Fine Art) Price: $59,090.

Price may change without prior notice

Shipping worldwide usually dispatched within 24 hours, delivery in 3-5 business days contact the gallery for shipping assistance or Pick Up from Galeria Aniela.

   

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Galeria Aniela offers buyers an opportunity to purchase top-quality autentic art of impeccable provenance, visit the gallery or phone +612 4465 1494

Shoalhaven at Sunset

ARTHUR BOYD (1920-1999) Shoalhaven at Sunset c1976-78 oil on copper, 60.5 x 43.0 cm signed lower right: Arthur BoydArthur Boyd (1920-1999)

Shoalhaven at Sunset circa 1976 -78

NOTES: 'Shoalhaven at Sunset‘ is a rare and particularly unrivalled Oil on Copper painting that inspired Google to change the company Logo, read the whole article, The Age, 24/07/2010.

Oil on Copper
Signed lower right: ARTHUR BOYD

Image: 60.5 x  43 cm

Price: Expression of Interest

Shipping worldwide usually dispatched within 24 hours, delivery in 3-5 business days contact the gallery for shipping assistance or Pick Up from Galeria Aniela.

Arthur Boyd exhibited Oil on Copper paintings at Australian Galleries Melbourne (1976) & at Fischer Fine Art London (1977). These exquisitely painted Oil on Copper artworks are very rare and most highly price valuable gems, keenly sought after by the World Art market collectors.

Prices: Boyd Oil on Copper

   

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Boyd Oil on copper prices

Arthur Boyd (Oil on Copper) prices:
Shoalhaven at Sunset (1976-78) 60.5 x 43 cm Price: $90,000 - $110,000 (excl. 25% Buyers Premium & GST) Lawson-Menzies Lot 61 21/11/2013)
Shoalhaven Broken Cliff Face 63.5 x 50.8 cm Price: $144,120 (£91,250) (Christie's London lot 33A 11/10/2011)
Pink Sky & Riverbank 31 x 21.5 cm Price (excl. GST): $78,000 (Sotheby's Australia 17/05/2011)
Timbered Rock Face (1974-6) 30.7 x 24.3 cm)
Price (excl. GST): $156,000 (Sotheby's Melbourne lot 10A 23/11/2010)
Forrest (1976) 30.9 x 21.6cm Price: (£50,460) $114,115 (Christie's London lot 52 16/12/2008)
Forest with Boulders (1976) 30.5 x 21.5cm Price: (£73,500) $166,220 (Christie's London 16/12/2008)

Shoalhaven at Sunset Google

Arthur Boyd 90th Birthday -  Google Logo Boyd-inspired "Shoalhaven at Sunset" , 24 July 2010Google Logo inspired by 'Shoalhaven at Sunset'
Arthur Boyd joined club that includes Leonardo da Vinci, Vincent Van Gogh, Andy Warhol, Norman Rockwell (the Google Doodle club.
   The Age, 24 July 2010

To mark the 90th anniversary of Arthur Boyd birth, Google honoured the artist with a Boyd-inspired reworking of its logo on the search engine's Australian home page. The Google - rework of the company's logo to mark significant events and people around the world was inspired by Shoalhaven at Sunset, a work from Boyd's famous Shoalhaven series.  Michael Lopez, the Google designer who created the logo, says he pored over Boyd's work searching for inspiration before being struck by the unique brushstrokes and colours of the Shoalhaven works. He was particularly taken, he says, by its pinks, reds, teals and earthy tones. ''The Shoalhaven series embodies that particular style,'' says Lopez. I tried to copy it brushstroke for brushstroke.'' The California-based Lopez' previous doodles include logos to mark the births of American painters Mary Cassatt (1844-1926) and Norman Rockwell (1894-1978). He did not know Boyd's work before he started the project but is now a fan.

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NOTES Shoalhaven Escarpment and Shoalhaven at Sunset 1976-78

After ten years in Europe where he built his international profile as a figurative modernist Australian artist, Arthur Boyd and his family returned to Australia and purchased the famous property at Bundanon on the Shoalhaven River in 1978. From that point on, he set about painting the immense power of the formidable river landscape –  the strength of the land, the river in flood, the passage of twilight, and the almost heraldic image of Pulpit Rock –  generally imbued with allegorical narratives of the human condition.

 

Shoalhaven at Sunset c1975-78 is a jewel-like early Oil on Copper (from the period of the artist greatest artistic acclaim), painted with the colours of the oil paint reflected from an underlying copper surface, giving it the brilliance. This makes the sunset colours seem heightened, more sensual, but that would be for any viewer who had not been to the Shoalhaven and experienced the intensity of light over the river at sunset. Boyd captures a deeply spiritual experience philosophically tied to notions of sustainability: he strove lifelong for the preservation of the bush landscape for future generations. Boyd’s sunset image shows a white cockatoo coming alive, turning, squawking, descending, as day turns to night. It twists high above the basalt layers of the riverbank. It is here that the river gums stand above the waterline, straining for water in days of endless drought. Boyd marks his belief in the sustainability of this environment with a foreground triangular structure of rocks and trees, like a strong abiding haven for the descending cockatoo. Professor Peter James Smith BSc (Hons); Msc; M Stats; MFA; Phd. November 3, 2013

 

 

Oil on Copper

Oil on Copper assures the artwork eternal archival. The technique allows also the exceptional clarity of colours reflected from the underlying copper surface, making colours heightened, and giving intensity of glowing light and its brilliance. Around 1700's artists painted small (Oil on Copper) paintings but the contemporary artists seldom use the technique due to many challenges like: smooth slippery surface, flexing of the metal, an unwavering brush, and humidity and quickly drying paint. Paintings (Oil on Copper) are rare and special, superior to Oil on Board or Canvas.

Arthur Boyd was a master painter, and developed new techniques in his preferred style and media. Boyd would often use loose strokes of thickly coated brushes, applied paint with his fingers and palm because it is quicker, while the body contact directly connected him with the painting. Boyd believed this allowed for his greater sense of freedom and pleasure from the act of painting.

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Galeria Aniela offers an opportunity to purchase top-quality, genuine art of impeccable provenance, visit the gallery or phone +612 4465 1494
Shoalhaven Riverbank  circa 1970-75

Arthur Boyd, Shoalhaven Riverbank c.1970, Oil on Copper, 62 cm x  45 cmArthur Boyd (1920-1999)

Shoalhaven Escarpment circa 1975-78

Oil on Copper Signed lower right: ARTHUR BOYD

 Image: 60.5 x  43 cm

NOTES: Arthur Boyd exhibited Oil on Copper paintings at Australian Galleries Melbourne (1976) & at Fischer Fine Art London (1977). These exquisitely painted Oil on Copper artworks are very rare and most highly price valuable gems, keenly sought after by the World Art market collectors.

Price: Expression of Interest

Shipping worldwide usually dispatched within 24 hours, delivery in 3-5 business days contact the gallery for shipping assistance or Pick Up from Galeria Aniela.

Prices of Arthur Boyd Oil on Copper

   

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recent Boyd Oil on copper prices

Arthur Boyd recent Oil on Copper prices include:
Shoalhaven at Sunset (1976-78) 60.5 x 43cm Price: $90,000 - $110,000 (excluding 25% Buyers Premium & GST) Lawson-Menzies (21/11/2013)
Shoalhaven Broken Cliff Face 63.5 x 50.8 cm Price
: $144,120 (£91,250) (Christie's London lot 33A 11/10/2011)
Pink Sky & Riverbank 31 x 21.5 cm Price (excl. GST): $78,000 (Sotheby's Australia 17/05/2011)
Timbered Rock Face (1974-6) 30.7 x 24.3 cm) Price (excl. GST)
: $156,000 (Sotheby's Melbourne lot 10A 23/11/2010)
Forrest (1976) 30.9 x 21.6cm Price: (£50,460) $114,115
(Christie's London lot 52 16/12/2008)
Forest with Boulders (1976) 30.5 x 21.5cm price: (£73,500) $166,220 (Christie's London 16/12/2008)

   

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Galeria Aniela offers buyers an opportunity to purchase top-quality autentic art of impeccable provenance, visit the gallery or phone +612 4465 1494

Shoalhaven River, Three White Cockatoos

Arthur Boyd (1920-1999), Shoalhaven River with Three White Cockatoos, Oil on Board, 38 cm x 31 cmArthur Boyd (1920-1999)

Shoalhaven River with Three White Cockatoos

Signed Lower right: ARTHUR BOYD

Oil on Board

Image Size: 38 cm x 30.8 cm
Framed Size: 73 cm x 65 cm

Price: Enquire
$44,500
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Shoalhaven River, Black Swan, Two White Cockatoos

Arthur Boyd (1920-1999), Shoalhaven Rive with Black Swan and Two White Cockatoos, Oil on board, 38 cm x 31 cmArthur Boyd (1920-1999)

Shoalhaven River with Black Swan and Two White Cockatoos

Signed Lower right: ARTHUR BOYD

Oil on Board

Image Size: 38 cm x 30.8 cm

Framed Size: 73 cm x 65 cm

Price: Enquire
$44,500
Buy Now 
make an offer

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Galeria Aniela offers buyers an opportunity to purchase top-quality autentic art of impeccable provenance, visit the gallery or phone +612 4465 1494
Shoalhaven River Black Swan, Three White Cockatoos

rthur Boyd (1920-1999), Shoalhaven River with Black Swan and Three White Cockatoos, Oil on board, 38 cm x 31 cmArthur Boyd (1920-1999)

Shoalhaven River  Black Swan and Three White Cockatoos

Signed Lower right: ARTHUR BOYD

Oil on Board

Image Size: 38 cm x 30.8 cm

Framed Size: 73 cm x 65 cm

Price: Enquire
$44,500
Buy Now 
make an offer

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Shoalhaven River with Black Swan

Arthur Boyd (1920-1999), Shoalhaven River with Black Swan, Oil on board, 38 cm x 31 cmArthur Boyd (1920-1999)

Shoalhaven River with Black Swan

Signed Lower right: ARTHUR BOYD

Oil on Board

Image Size: 38 cm x 30.8 cm

Framed Size: 73 cm x 65 cm

Price: Enquire
 $44,500 Buy Now make an offer

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 Prices may change without a prior notice please contact us

The Shoalhaven River  with Clouds

Arthur Boyd (1920-1999), Shoalhaven River with Clouds, Oil on Board, 31 cm x 21 cmArthur Boyd (1920-1999)

Shoalhaven River with Clouds c. 1980

Oil on Board

Signed Lower right: ARTHUR BOYD

Image: 31 x 21 cm
Framed: 65 x 56 cm

NOTES: Arthur Boyd had a strong relationship between the landscape and the Shoalhaven River. The Shoalhaven River was the constant source of inspiration for Boyd's work. In 1993, Arthur Boyd gave his estate on Shoalhaven River in NSW (Bundanon) to the nation for the benefit of all Australians. The paintings that Boyd painted on the location of the riverbank were small, large works he usually painted in his Bundanon studio.

Price: Enquire
 $33,500  Buy Now make an offer

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Galeria Aniela offers buyers an opportunity to purchase top-quality autentic art of impeccable provenance, visit the gallery or phone +612 4465 1494

About Shoalhaven series 

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At the beginning of 1975 Arthur Boyd return to Australia from England  and lived for a year on the banks of the Shoalhaven River in New South Wales. The paintings in this collection were conceived during that year. The Narcissus paintings grew out of the subject -- water, reflections and the presence of a wild rock orchid. Some of the paintings continue early themes such as Bride drinking from a Creek.' 'So as in Australian painting, as in all great landscape painting, the scenery is not painted for its own sake, but as a background of a legend and a reflection of human values.' K. Clark, introduction to Recent Australian Painting, Whitechapel Gallery, London, 1961.

In the wake of the paintings on copper (Shoalhaven at Sunset, Shoalhaven River with Cockatoos and Shoalhaven Sunset) which literally fixed the Shoalhaven landscape in all its minute detail, Boyd began, with the ongoing stimulus of Porter's poetry, to introduce the moral narrative to the set.

The imagery here echoes his Bride pictures and the subsequent Diana and Actaeon series of 1961, with its bestial metamorphoses. At the same time, in 1976, Boyd begins work on his Narcissus series of etchings, set in the same Shoalhaven locale, with its riverbank and reflecting pools under Pulpit Rock.

In 1984 Arthur and Yvonne Boyd left London to Australia and, more specifically, to their property Bundanon, which lies midway between Sydney and Canberra, on the Shoalhaven River near Nowra on the New South Wales south coast. However Boyd's joy at re-discovering the Australian landscape was tempered with a distressing awareness of the careless treatment of the natural environment by reckless and hedonistic visitors. Boyd was a practical environmentalist who, together with Sidney Nolan, had fought to stop sand-dredging near Riversdale on the Shoalhaven in 1981.

The artist is recorded as saying: "I think Australians have been apt to believe that because this was such a vast land, they couldn't make a mark on it. But a mark has been made and if it continues at this rate, it will soon be too late..." (Arthur Boyd, cited in J McKenzie, Arthur Boyd Art & Life, London, 2000, p.169).

Thus while the subject matter of Boyd's Bather series followed a long established western art historical tradition, Boyd's rendering of this theme was imbued with both personal and contemporary environmental concerns, as Hoff noted in the following extract:

"Boyd's NOW in bathers, which had not occupied him since the early fifties was revived by Cézanne's Bathers in the London, National Gallery. The idyllic and secluded beach, far from the city, which Conder and Streeton had made popular, is replaced by the beach in the technological age. Cars and speedboats, raucous cries of a hedonistic mob break the calm of nature. What Boyd owes to Cézanne is the considered build-up of the figures into a frieze composition. The stunning effect of the huge painting rests on the contrast between hot tints, ugly masks and monstrous forms of a crowd and the beauty of the natural world. Above the garish human turmoil rises the impressive, timeless riverbank. Luminous cumulus clouds scud across the deep blue sky. Never before in Boyd's work have nature and man stood in such striking juxtaposition. To quote Elwyn Lynn, "the work is the epitome of the creative continuity of Arthur Boyd's art." (U Hoff, op.cit, p.81).

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Bride Drinking from Shoalhaven River

Arthur Boyd (1920-1999), Bride with Necklace Drinking from the Shoalhaven River c.1970-75, Oil on Board, 30 cm x 20 cmArthur Boyd (1920-1999)

Bride with a Necklace drinking from Shoalhaven River, Pulpit Rock c. 1975

Oil on Board

Signed lower right: Arthur Boyd

Image size: 30.6 x 20.8 cm

Framed Size: 65 x 56 cm

NOTES: Arthur Boyd beautiful 'Bride' paintings are rare and among his finest, a beautiful powerful figure of Boyd imagery. Bride paintings are in major public collections:  Tate Gallery London National Gallery of Victoria, National Gallery of Australia, Art Gallery of South Australia confirm the stature of Arthur Boyd legacy in Australian and international art.

Bride Running Away (1957) Price: $1,680,000 (Sotheby's 5/08/2012)
The Frightened Bridegroom Price: $1,200,000 (Sotheby's  23/08/2011)

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NOTES 'Bride with Necklace

Bride with Necklace drinking from Shoalhaven River, Pulpit Rock circa 1970-75

Arthur Boyd ’Bride with Necklace drinking from Shoalhaven River’  is a master work, painted with great buoyancy circa 1970-75. On the background of the Pulpit Rock ‘The Bride’ descends to Shoalhaven River to drink water. The symbolism of water has a universal undertone of ‘purity and fertility’ and is often viewed as the source of life itself. Symbolically water means Transformation, Subconscious, Fertilization, Purification, Reflection, Intuition, Renewal, Blessing, Motion and Life.

The Bride, associated with love, beauty and fertility is wearing a 'Necklace'. The ‘necklace’ symbolizes the beauty and look of wealth. Necklace believed to hold the power to bring great happiness. The necklace resembles new life, growth, a fresh start and new beginnings. But also, more spiritually, 'a Necklace' stands for; nurturing, tranquillity, purity, personal growth, awakening and positive change. Historically a necklace has cultural significance as well as huge spiritual, the function is to commemorate ancestors and honour mythological beings and their stories.

The painting ’Bride with Necklace drinking from Shoalhaven River’ is characteristically Arthur Boyd with attention to details and superb tone of colour and texture, is one of Boyd's most beautiful small Brides paintings that belongs to the prestigious the Bride series.

Arthur Boyd had a strong relationship between the landscape and the Shoalhaven River. The Shoalhaven River was the constant source of inspiration for Arthur Boyd's work. In 1993, Arthur Boyd gave his Bundanon estate on Shoalhaven River in NSW to the nation for the benefit of many.

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Arthur Boyd (1920-1999),  Bride and Serpent, Oil on Canvas, 122 cm x 102 cmBride and Serpent

 Arthur Boyd (1920-1999)

Bride and Serpent Illustrated

 Oil on Canvas

Size: 122 cm x 102 cm

Signed lower right: ARTHUR BOYD

NOTES: Arthur Boyd hauntingly beautiful 'Bride' paintings are rare and among his finest, firm of figure and powerful of imagery. The presence of a Bride painting is rarely seen in private collections, rather major public collections:  Tate Gallery LondonNational Gallery of Victoria, National Gallery of Australia, Art Gallery of South Australia confirm the stature of Arthur Boyd legacy in Australian and international art.

Bride Running Away (1957) Price: $1,680,000 (Sotheby's 5/08/2012)
The Frightened Bridegroom Price: $1,200,000 (Sotheby's  23/08/2011)

 Expression of Interest
An expression of interest (EOI) is an informal offer made by a strategic or financial buyer for the purchase of an artwork. The primary purpose is to suggest a valuation range that a buyer is willing to pay for an artwork.

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Bride and Serpent Illustrated:

Exhibited:
1997 Galeria Aniela "Best of Boyd" exhibition open by Cameron O'Reilly, Dep. Chairman National Gallery of Australia
Sydney Morning Herald (the Front page) | 17 May 1997)
2005 - The Art Lounge Gallery, Sydney, open by Edmund Capon Director Art Gallery of New South Wales

Love, Marriage and Death of a Half-Caste, as the series was called collectively, touches on the epic and the heroic, an Antipodean tragedy of the proportions of Romeo and Juliet. In  Boyd 'Bride' series, his technique ...... became more painterly and figures integrated with their bush land settings. The figures metamorphosed into dragonflies or windmills as themes of thwarted love, of Eros; and references to classical mythology emerged in the highly personalized, often erotic, symbolism, influenced by Renaissance masters and the vigor of contemporary expressionism. Arthur Boyd paintings took on a greater thickness through the developed skill of his handling.

Certainly Arthur Boyd paintings from the Bride series are part of the iconography for much of his rich ..output"  Courtesy: Peter Fish The Money-Business Sydney Morning Herald, 1 October 2005. In Bride series at a Waterfall the plunging figure in white becomes the waterfall at which she drinks below, the fire consuming passion of her lover emerging from the primal forest, figured partly in elements of face and hand reaching to touch the downward rush. Figures emerge and submerge in the bush-land of a highly idiosyncratic work, of multiple meaning and quenching thirst, redolent with the energy of drama. Curtsey: Sotheby's catalogue, 23 April 2007. The bride series same as the Nebuchadnezzar (sometimes on fire) , and other themes series continued into years.

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About Bride series

Arthur Boyd 'Bride series'

   

In 1951 30-year-old Arthur Boyd travelled to Central Australia where he witnessed the strained relationships between indigenous Australians and white Australians. In Persecuted lovers, a painting from the series Love, Marriage and Death of a Half-Caste 1957–58 a rifleman takes aim on two lovers with silent murderous anticipation.

In 1957, Arthur Boyd developed his first series of Bride images, known more formally as Love, Marriage and Death of a Half-caste. The early works in the series had as their focus the relationship between Australia's white and indigenous occupants. By the 1960s, however, this earlier political emphasis had changed: Boyd's attention was fixed more on the subject of the bride in the landscape.

In his 1960s images, Boyd frequently combined the motif of a bride drinking from a river with another favoured visual trope "the diagonally plunging figure with the bridal gown flared-out and bell-shaped there is a play with the poetic ambivalence of metaphoric associations: the drinking bride is insect-like, as is the washing figure, not spider now but rather dragonfly or butterfly, a white bridal insect lost and watched in wild solitude." (F. Phillipp, Arthur Boyd, London, 1967, p.100).

The bride's appearance in Bride on the Shoalhaven is reminiscent of these works from the 1960s, particularly Bride Drinking from a Pool. Nevertheless, in Bride on the Shoalhaven, painted in the mid-1980s, the wild solitude of Boyd's 1960s landscape has lightened, becoming less embedding of the figure it surrounds: a shift perhaps prompted by Boyd's acquisition of his beloved Bundanon.

The artist first visited Bundanon, a property located on the Shoalhaven River on the south coast of New South Wales, in 1971. Boyd felt an immediate affinity with the area and in 1973 purchased the nearby property of Riversdale, subsequently acquiring Bundanon in 1979.

The canvas follows a format familiar to Boyd's Shoalhaven paintings of the mid-1970s, with the surface broken up into horizontal bands containing cobalt blue sky, the steep slope of the riverbank and the river. The disparate elements are linked by both the textural application of the paint, as well as the immense figure of the bride, who swoops, bird-like, into the water. Her vertical movement is replicated by the trunks of the trees, which divide the canvas by stripes of white, grey and taupe.

Boyd had an intimate knowledge of the landscape that he painted, acquired through both living and working in the area. Furthermore, his prolific production of small Shoalhaven landscapes on copper, which were characterised by precision and detail, helped to imbue his larger scale paintings with a delicacy and lightness of touch. By the late 1980s, the Shoalhaven was the source of inspiration for much of Boyd's work, but this did not result in the artist abandoning his earlier imagery and themes. Exemplified by Bride on the Shoalhaven, Boyd unites the mystical figure of the bride with the exquisite Shoalhaven landscape.

In the painted world of Arthur Boyd's imagining, "people are suspended between worlds, or states of being, between the pitiless forces of nature and the god-like grace of being human, between hostility and serenity, participation and voyeurism, love and lust and so on" (B. Pearce, "Arthur Boyd", Australian Painters of the Twentieth Century, Sydney, 2000, p.149).

Boyd moved with his family to London late in 1959. There, his exposure to the works of Piero di Cosimo and Titian broadened the artist's horizons, enabling him to tap into a wellspring of mythological and symbolic currents that would continue to shape his art for the rest of his life. This attraction to the mythological did not distract Boyd from the course he had set as an artist during the previous thirty years in Australia: rather, it would imbue much of his art from this time on with a dramatic darkness and resonance.

Bride with her Lover exemplifies the artist's new-found expressiveness, taking the theme of the Bride, which originated in the late 1950s as a symbol of his horror at the living conditions of Aboriginal Australians, and transforming her into a universal figure. In the case of Bride with her Lover, the universality of the Bride seems, as in a related work Double Nude II "to have grown out of the (ex-) half-caste lovers of 1960: bared of clothes as of the last vestiges of the original 'story' the united lovers have turned into a 'joined figure' - to use a Boydian title- suggestive perhaps of the bisexual oneness of the platonic myth, but stated with characteristic literalness. The spectrum of meaning may run from love-death, the re-entering of an eternal cycle, to narcissistic doom." (F. Philipp, Arthur Boyd, London, 1967, p.96).

The eternality of the scene is not only to be found in the symbiotic melding of the two central figures, but also their dissolution into the surrounding landscape. The groom's body is given substance only through his eyes, the fingers of his left hand, and a swathe of black curls, highlighted with sweeps of white paint, which tumble around his face. Otherwise, his body disappears into the forest floor, made insubstantial below and hidden from above by the bride's wedding gown and veil. Although given greater substance, the bride, too, melds into the forest, white swathes of paint in her veil turning to the blue of the background hill, her skirt dissolving into the trees on the left. A crow observes the couple from a tree, a reminder again of the eternal cycle of love and death.

When Arthur Boyd visited the desert regions of Central Australia in 1951, he could hardly have imagined that paintings resulting from that experience would, within the decade, be shown in a London gallery; purchased by Australian, British and American collectors; and become the basis of his international recognition. His work is now represented in the Australian national and all state galleries and his 'Bride' series, which includes Bride walking in a Creek I, is ranked among his greatest achievements.

Born in 1920 in Melbourne, into a dynasty of artists, Arthur Boyd enrolled intermittently at the National Gallery of Victoria's art school during the 1930s, he learnt primarily from his family and their wider intellectual circle in Melbourne: painting techniques, art history, biblical history and an intense emotional engagement with news brought from Europe by immigrant friends.

Arthur Boyd was deeply moved by stories of displacement and dispossession. Austrian-born fellow artist Josl Bergner had fled pre-War Europe in 1937. The art historian Franz Philipp, an early supporter of Boyd's work, arrived in Australia aboard the prison ship Dunera: one of over 2000 German and Austrian interns sent from Britain in 1940. Boyd himself served briefly and unhappily in the Australian army during the Second World War.

Then, as his biographer Barry Pearce explains, Boyd found in the Aboriginal settlements near Alice Springs, in Central Australia, a race of displaced people, caught between two cultures, 'and the implication in it of something universal'. He saw and sketched shanty towns, shearers, tribes people, and witnessed an Aboriginal marriage with 'half-caste' women dressed in wedding gowns.

Although profoundly dismayed by the plight of the Aboriginal people he met in the Northern Territor and aware that this was a contemporary tragedy unknown to most urban Australians, Boyd was not known in making a social-realist record. Rather, he took the idea of a half-caste groom wooing a half-caste bride, worked it into a series of large scale paintings and constructed a kind of ballad or a 'passion play about the tribulations associated with the pursuit of love'.

Originally Arthur Boyd called his Bride series 'Love, marriage and death of a half-caste'.

   

In the earliest paintings, first exhibited in Melbourne in 1958, there is clear reference to the arid landscape around Alice Springs. Floating figures, posies of flowers and a blue-faced Aboriginal groomsman deliberately call Chagall to mind. However, here in Bride walking in a Creek I, the background is more verdant, the pigments densely worked into a setting for a haunting dream of love and loss.

Boyd included Bride walking in a Creek in the now iconic 1959 exhibition of the 'Antipodeans': the manifesto of Melbourne's leading young artists upholding figurative expressionism in avant-garde art. This was also one of the paintings Boyd took with him when he and his family sailed for Europe at the end of that year and was included in his first London one-man show at the Zwemmer Gallery.

Clearly Boyd's composition owes something to Rembrandt's Woman bathing in a Stream of 1654 in the London National Gallery. In the calm after the storm of the war years, Boyd had turned to the Old Masters for inspiration, researching traditional techniques in publications such as The Materials of the Artist and their Use in Painting by Max Doerner (1934).

By 1959, Boyd had studied important paintings by Rembrandt at the Gallery in Melbourne but knew A woman bathing in a stream only in reproduction. Indeed he painted a copy from a reproduction in the mid 1940s; as well as two versions of Susanna and the Elders, one of these a mural completed in 1948-9 for the dining room of his uncle Martin Boyd's country house.

Where Rembrandt depicted his mistress Hendrickje Stoffels wading in a stream and evoking variously a mythological Diana or a biblical Susanna or Bathsheba, Boyd's wading woman is clearly Australian. In surviving photographs of his Susanna mural, sadly now destroyed, the trees hanging over the water are eucalyptus. 

Similarly, Boyd's bride is walking, with her Rembrandtesque garment lifted, in a distinctly antipodean 'creek' - reminiscent of the upper reaches of the Yarra River. In the words of Franz Philipp, 'Rembrandt the humanist, the moral, psychological and poetic interpreter of the Bible and, in it, of mankind, appealed to a painter of strong humane and moral convictions'. 

However, rather than mere homage, there is a note of affectionate irony in Boyd's relationship with the art of the past. Boyd's reference to Susanna in Bride walking in a Creek is more overt than Rembrandt's in A woman bathing in a stream, for he includes a dark profile-head watching from the foreground (somewhat reminiscent of the profiled Elder in Rembrandt's earlier Susanna and the Elders, 1647, in the Berlin Gem'ldegalerie).

Yet Boyd's approach to the theme is entirely his own. Just as the apocryphal Susanna innocently aroused sexual desire in old men who spied on and then falsely accused her, so Boyd's Bride seems oblivious of the observer in the bush.  In Boyd's Bride paintings the blue-shaded face is often accompanied by another watcher - the slightly ominous but apparently benign black crow. 

Although there is a powerful underlying eroticism in this work, the theme of Boyd's Bride series, more than anything else, is humanity's suspension between worlds. 'The half-caste's dilemma was between what we have and what we want; what we are and what we fear'.  Arthur Boyd's art at its greatest is both intensely personal and profoundly universal.

Bride walking in a Creek is one of very few major paintings from this iconic series to have remained, 'undiscovered' in the collection of its first owner's family for almost fifty years. Barry Pearce, Arthur Boyd, retrospective, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 1993, pp. 20-21. . (2) Franz Philipp, Arthur Boyd, Thames & Hudson, London, 1967, p. 45. . (3) Pearce, op. cit., p. 21.

About Arthur Boyd Bride series Christies NOTES

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Arthur Boyd's Bride series has rightfully earned a canonical place in Australian art history, due to its powerful picotrialisation of issues of social justice, rendered in a poetic style that blends figuration with an abstracted surrealism. It has been suggested that "The Bride series constitutes, together with Nolan's two series on Burke and Wils and Ned Kelly, the most powerful visual images to emerge from Australian painting... in this century." (U Hoff, The Art of Arthur Boyd, London, 1986, p.22.)

The original title of the series was 'Love, Marriage and Death of a Half-Caste', a title that was deliberately ambiguous. Rather than presenting a simplistic symbolism of a longed for union between white and black Australia, Boyd avoided a reductive simplification of the racial issues by making both the bride and bridegroom half-caste. The complexity of the narrative relations was deepened by the doubling of the bride figure in the form of an impossible phantom bride, who is the object of a dream-like desire that is destined to remain forever unfulfilled.

Through the cycle of missed gazes that is the emotional core of this painting, Boyd evoked unfulfilled longing and a sense of isolation within the compositional embrace of the figures, in the process transposing contemporary social issues into poetic and painterly allegory. Although this work is undeniably one of the more gentle images from the series, the central theme of the Bride paintings is the dream of integration through love, an ideal which is stripped of its romanticism by the culture of racism and violence that is the fundamental reason preventing the lovers from union. Boyd first became aware of the plight of the indigenous Australians when he visited the Simpson Desert in Central Australia in 1951.

In Boyd's extant sketchbooks and recorded reminiscences from the 1951 journey, he records seeing Aborigines and half-castes "...living in squalor in shanty towns, whorlies and dry riverbeds." (Hoff, op.cit, p.49.) Boyd himself commented that "They are forced into this position and it has a serious effect on you, when you are not used to it... You suddenly come against it after imagining that they are noble savage types living in the bush..." (A Boyd cited in F Philipp, op.cit. pp.84-86.)

Since the time of colonisation, Aboriginals had been the subject of many works of art by colonial artists and continued to be depicted in the art of Boyd's contemporaries such as Russell Drysdale. Common to all of these works however, was either an idealisation of Aboriginal culture or their portrayal in an isolated landscape devoid of social context.

With the Bride series, Boyd became the first Australian artist to represent indigenous Australian within a cross-cultural social context, thereby confronting the deep divisions that exist between white and black Australia. The blonde curls, white face and straight nose (a hallmark of European physiognomy) of the bride contrasts strongly with the bearded, pug-nosed face of her bridegroom. Although she too is half-caste, for her thwarted suitor she remains the symbol of an unobtainable union with white Australia.

The bridegroom is represented in his usual watchful pose, with knees drawn up and an inscrutable expression on his face; a pose that Philipp interpreted as that of "the dreamer".

Boyd's engagement with art historical precedents is also evident in this work which contains allusions to Chagall. Philipp noted that: "The following paintings are pitched in a less substantial and coller mode, with tenebrous blues and greens dominating.

Bridegroom waiting for his Bride to grow up, on of the highest poetic realizations of the series, is also a key picture. Moving towards a more severe style, it still lacks the frozenness and textural austerity of the monumental group: the paint is scumbled in the blue posy-tree and the veil of the phantom bride's head which emerges from it.

This painting more than any other suggests to me an awareness of Chagall. Boyd fully masters the kinetics of his marionettes, which seem suspended from one fulcrum of gravity: their startled and obsessed stance and movement, their all-eye stare, the click of their non-relations." (F Philipp, op.cit, p.92.) The half-caste bridegroom, his transitional cultural status made evident through his European dress and bare feet, wears a suit directly derived from the bridegroom in Chagall's floating wedding pictures.

Situated within a stark and denuded landscape that further emphasises the pathos of the displacement of the Aborigines, he is now incongrous in his native landscape. It is the subtle representation of this final indignity that freed Australian art from depictions of indigenous Australians as 'noble savages' and allowed a modern political conscience into our artistic culture.

The recurring motif of weightlessness sees the bride being constantly pulled away from her beloved by an unseen force that contradicts gravity. In all of the Bride pictures there is a repetition of something, or someone, being trodden on: in 'Bridegroom waiting for his Bride to grow up', the bridegroom treads on her train and holds the posy-tree between his toes. As Franz Philipp noted: "Boyd's ballad, then, is a dream play: the half-caste girl... turns into the 'white bride' who cannot grow up (i,e, become real...) Always she remains in a dream which the dreamer tries to retain, to hold with his clumsy physical weight by stepping on the bridal train or by sitting on it... (Philipp, op.cit, p.88.)

Such subtle compositional devices act as eloquent truths about the nature of inherited burdens, which, once understood, are all the more forcible for being cloaked in allegory. Boyd's use of tempera mixed with oil results in a beguiling translucency that adds to the dreamlike quality of the painting and is particularly evident in the face of the bride. The painting is an essay in texture with the scumbled areas of subtle colour contrasting with the smooth finish evident in areas such as the bridegroom's jacket which in turn gives way to the impasto used in the flowers.

Boyd brilliantly used materials and technique to underscore the narrative and composition of the work as may be seen in the denser paint evident in the endearingly ungainly figure of the bridegroom. His solidity is in marked contrast to the thinly layered paint used to represent both of the brides and which contributes to the sense of their ethereality.

The significance of the Bride series was evident from the advent of its first exhibition and led to solo shows for Boyd in Australia and a retrospective at the Whitechapel Gallery in London. With the Bride series, Hoff concluded "Boyd ceases to be precocious and achieves both absolute originality and complete maturity; these paintings are, I believe, the watershed of his art and without them he could not have done some of the notable later series." (U Hoff, op.cit., p.22.)

Turning allegory into a weapon for social awareness, Boyd simultaneously highlighted his sophistication as an artist while portraying the deeper complexities of a social problem that continues to confront a psychologically post-colonial Australi. The series of which this painting is an integral part will always be ranked as one of the pre-eminent contributions to Australia's pictorial history.

Arthur Boyd white bride searches for her lost aboriginal groom in a fantastic landscape inhabited by predatory birds. Marriage between aboriginals and white women was a taboo subject in Australia in 1948. She hovers above her lost lover whose body is half immersed in the creek. Threatening birds hop dangerously close, the nearer with a large red penetratingly-observant eye. Perhaps the birds represent a disapproving populace ready to pounce if things get too far out of hand. Misty landscape features blur the coalescence of the figures and threatening clouds add to our sense of foreboding.

Boyd's place as one of Australia's most significant painters of the 20th century, was based on a prodigious talent and effervescent, if often bleak, imagination. In 1959, the Boyd family moved to London. His first London exhibition (Zwemmer Galleries, July-Aug 1960), comprising the bride series on the theme of thwarted lovers, was a prelude to his representation in the Whitechapel and Tate Gallery exhibitions, 1961,62.

By the mid-1970's he had gifted several thousand works to the NGA and in 1973, he and Yvonne Boyd purchased a house and property, Riverdale, at Shoalhaven, on the south coast of NSW, followed a few years later by the nearby Bundanon, both of these properties they gave to the nation in 1993. Several feature films have been made on his work and in 1993, Barry Pearce curated a major retrospective of his paintings, prints, drawings and ceramics for the AGNSW, which toured to other state galleries in 1994. His work has been included in every major touring exhibition of Australian art since the mid 1970s.

Awards: Dunlop Prizes, Melb., 1950, 52; Kuringai, NSW Prize, 1958; Henry Casselli Richards Prize, Brisb, 1963; Brittanica Australia Award, 1971; artist-in-residence, ANU, 1970-72; AO, 1979; AC, 1992; Australian of the year 1995.

Reference: McCulloch, A., McCulloch, S., McCulloch Childs, E., The New McCulloch's Encyclopedia of Australian Art, (4th edition), The Miegunyah Press, Melbourne, 2006, pp.274.

Encapsulating the heroic and poetic in an Antipodean tragedy of thwarted lovers, Arthur Boyd’s ‘Love, Marriage and Death of a Half-Caste’ series 1954–59 is universally considered among his finest. Thus, upon his arrival in London shortly after completion of the landmark series for which he had won so much acclaim, Boyd did not immediately abandon this hauntingly beautiful theme but rather, began to develop the imagery further – transforming his nubile bride from the wide-eyed, flat-footed innocent with all her earthly physicality to the sylph-like nymph featured here whose ephemeral presence hovers insect-like above the lush, wooded landscape.

Rare and highly sought-after, the small group of paintings resulting from such experimentation and exemplified by Landscape with Bride, Ram and Waterfall, moreover heralded significant thematic and stylistic shifts in the artist’s oeuvre that would culminate in his ‘mythological’ paintings of the late 1960s.

Profoundly influenced by the great masterpieces of Renaissance art which were now so readily accessible in Europe’s vast collections, these later Bride paintings poignantly illustrate the artist’s predilection for eclecticism at its extreme. Merging his previous interpretations of the theme with literary references to classical mythology and his predecessors’ pictorial meditations upon the destinies of Eros, Boyd here creates his own highly personal, erotic symbolism; as Rosenthal elucidates, ‘In many pictures, the fantasy has a basis in metamorphosis, as in Nude Turning into Dragonfly or Bride Turning into a Windmill.

In others, Boyd displays his enduring habit of eclectic borrowing – for example, the fruitful left breast from Tintoretto’s Origin of the Milky Way or the mournful, seated dog from Piero di Cosimo’s picture of the satyr mourning a dead girl.’1 All are nevertheless distinguished from Boyd’s previous work by a more sophisticated painterly technique in which the relative flatness of the picture surface is exchanged for a heavier impasto style featuring thick streaks of paint carefully worked with a knife or brush-handle akin to the vigour of contemporary expressionism.

A superb example of this later series, Landscape with Bride, Ram and Waterfall features the chief protagonist portrayed as a dark, hovering, half-transparent phantom, the white halo of her veil forming a full circle recalling the blades of a turning windmill while below, the burning, consuming passion of her lover emerges from the darkness of the primeval forest. In its themes of allurement and the threat of unknown depths, the work evokes unmistakable associations with the myth of Narcissus, while stylistically the motif of the flaming bushland prefigures the artist’s fiery explorations of the Old Testament Nebuchadnezzar theme. Like the best of Boyd’s achievements, the present work offers a highly idiosyncratic composition, of multiple meaning and quenching thirst, and redolent with the energy of drama.

Rosenthal, T., ‘Introduction’ in Hoff, U., The Art of Arthur Boyd, Andre Deutsche, London, 1986, pp. 22–3.

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Credits to: Christies, - Arthur Boyd, Bride with her lover - 2005, 22 August

In the painted world of Arthur Boyd's imagining, "people are suspended between worlds, or states of being, between the pitiless forces of nature and the god-like grace of being human, between hostility and serenity, participation and voyeurism, love and lust and so on" (B. Pearce, "Arthur Boyd", Australian Painters of the Twentieth Century, Sydney, 2000, p.149). Boyd moved with his family to London late in 1959. There, his exposure to the works of Piero di Cosimo and Titian broadened the artist's horizons, enabling him to tap into a wellspring of mythological and symbolic currents that would continue to shape his art for the rest of his life.

This attraction to the mythological did not distract Boyd from the course he had set as an artist during the previous thirty years in Australia: rather, it would imbue much of his art from this time on with a dramatic darkness and resonance.

Bride with her Lover exemplifies the artist's new-found expressiveness, taking the theme of the Bride, which originated in the late 1950s as a symbol of his horror at the living conditions of Aboriginal Australians, and transforming her into a universal figure.

In the case of Bride with her Lover, the universality of the Bride seems, as in a related work Double Nude II "to have grown out of the (ex-) half-caste lovers of 1960: bared of clothes as of the last vestiges of the original 'story' the united lovers have turned into a 'joined figure' - to use a Boydian title- suggestive perhaps of the bisexual oneness of the platonic myth, but stated with characteristic literalness.

The spectrum of meaning may run from love-death, the re-entering of an eternal cycle, to narcissistic doom." (F. Philipp, Arthur Boyd, London, 1967, p.96). The eternality of the scene is not only to be found in the symbiotic melding of the two central figures, but also their dissolution into the surrounding landscape.

The groom's body is given substance only through his eyes, the fingers of his left hand, and a swathe of black curls, highlighted with sweeps of white paint, which tumble around his face. Otherwise, his body disappears into the forest floor, made insubstantial below and hidden from above by the bride's wedding gown and veil.

Although given greater substance, the bride, too, melds into the forest, white swathes of paint in her veil turning to the blue of the background hill, her skirt dissolving into the trees on the left. A crow observes the couple from a tree, a reminder again of the eternal cycle of love and death.

   

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Historic Boyd exhibition in Galeria Aniela share        Return Top

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signed by Arthur Boyd                                                      Boyd with Aniela 1995 Return Top
 
  Yvonne and Arthur Boyd photo 1997  share        Return Top
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